Glass Noodle Stir Fry With Crab Soy Free Close Up Of Korean Glnoodles Japchae Chapchae In A Bowl

Tuesday, February 19th 2019. | Pasta

Glass Noodle Stir Fry With Crab Soy Free Close Up Of Korean Glnoodles Japchae Chapchae In A Bowl Pasta

Undercooking is less common because undercooked pasta is crunchy and obviously difficult to chew. Overcooked pasta (much more common) is limp loses its shape easily and won t hold a sauce well. Unfortunately overcooked pasta is not salvageable so you ll have to throw it away and start again. The key to cooking pasta well is to keep testing it as you cook it. There will be a guide cooking time on the packet so about a minute before that time is up start testing the pasta. It is ready when it is slightly firm to the bite - a state the Italians call "al dente" (firm but not crunchy). At the al dente stage turn off the heat and drain the pasta in a colander. Shake the pasta to get rid of all excess water (be especially careful to do this if they are pasta shapes which catch pockets of hot water) and serve immediately. The pasta continues to cook while it s draining it in the colander so when you are testing remember that what you eat will be cooked for a minute or two longer than what you re testing in the pan.

That means the pasta is still not cooked. Once the core the strand has lost its whiteness that is the time for draining. PASTA SECRET #5: DRAINING Never overcook pasta. Only serve pasta "al dente" which literally means "firm to the tooth." Pasta needs to be cooked so as to be still firm when bitten (but only dry pasta should be cooked "al dente" because "fresh" pasta already is soft to begin with.) Make sure it is as much as possible "al dente" (not soft) because that is the most digestible state. Mushy pasta is not edible anymore at least for the pasta lover. Once the pasta is cooked before draining add a glass of cold water to stop the cooking. Drain the pasta but make sure you do not drain the pasta too much making it dry. The strands need to be glossy with moisture.

Specifically well salted boiling water. How much water depends on how much pasta you are cooking. Plenty of water is best but even if you are limited to a small pan do not fret all your pasta needs is salted boiling water. In a perfect world a large oversized pot would be best. But if you are cooking lets say a pound of pasta for a group to enjoy even an eight cup/two quart pan will do just fine. Yes eight cups or two quarts of water will do the trick for a pound of pasta. Bring the water to the highest boil you can and leave it at that temperature. Add enough salt (I recommend sea salt for both flavor and mineral content) so that you can just taste it in the water. Too much salt is as bad as too little salt. Once the water is boiling fiercely add the pasta and stir it briskly in the pan until it comes to a boil once again. Here is an old professional pasta cooking trick for when you are cooking any type of spaghetti or long pasta. Break the pasta in half before dropping it into the pan. Not only will it fit perfectly but it will cook evenly. You are not waiting for the pasta to cook and bend itself into the pan which can take over a minute. Your pasta will have the same perfect Al Dente (firm slightly hard slightly crunchy) texture all the way through. In addition it is Much Easier to eat. It also takes on sauces much better than foot long plus pasta. Most pasta packages recommend that you cook the pasta for a certain number of minutes.

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